Herbst Response to Endorsement from Family Institute of Connecticut

TRUMBULL -- GOP gubernatorial candidate and former Trumbull First Selectman Tim Herbst was endorsed Wednesday by the political arm of the Family Institute of Connecticut, an advocacy organization for socially conservative policies.

"I am the only Republican candidate building a broad coalition of support from across the ideological spectrum of our Party, in shared purpose, to defeat out-of-touch Malloy enabler Ned Lamont, upend business-as-usual in Hartford and restore prosperity to our state," Herbst said. 

"While we disagree on some issues, we share common ground in wanting to keep partisan activism out of our courts, opposing assisted suicide and supporting parental notification," Herbst continued.

"Democratic insiders in Hartford will no doubt attack this endorsement with hyperbole and vitriol, but Connecticut deserves a governor who seeks to unite all our residents behind a vision for prosperity and optimism in the future — not one that divides us against each other to score cheap political points," Herbst said. "Voters should reject divisive rhetoric from left-wing politicians that vilifies families who just want to live their lives and raise their children according to traditional values without interference from the government."

Herbst said he believed the organization was impressed by his bold leadership against Gov. Malloy's judicial activism.

"I was the first Republican figure in the state to oppose Gov. Malloy's nomination of Justice Andrew McDonald to be Chief Justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court because we can never allow the integrity of our judicial system to be compromised by the influence of partisan politics," Herbst noted. "There were very serious questions regarding Justice McDonald's history of partisanship and the role of his politics in his decision-making on the bench."

"Connecticut voters can be confident that I will nominate highly qualified judges who will uphold the law — not legislate from the bench according to the dictates of their personal politics," Herbst said.

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